Top 13 Roasts & Rambles

Herefordshire's best pub walks with awesome views, wild landscapes & cosy gastropubs

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Couple looking over River Wye
21st December, 2021

This winter, head to Herefordshire for glorious circular walks followed by a delicious pub lunch. Each of our Roasts & Rambles routes is designed take you through amazing landscapes with stunning views. And there's unexpected treats along the way, including wild mountain ponies, romantic castle ruins and ancient caves.

Afterwards, cosy up in one of our country pubs and dig into a well-earned lunch, featuring the best local produce.

1. Endless views from Hergest Ridge - the one with the wild mountain ponies!

Trek along the border between England and Wales, through the beautiful moorland of Hergest Ridge. It's a wild open space, drink in the magnificent 360-degree views, which are only interrupted by the occasional grazing wild pony. You'll walk along a favoured section of Offa's Dyke Path, Britain’s longest surviving ancient monument, and also spot a motte and bailey. The circular route starts and finishes in the tiny historic town of Kington with lunch at the nearby foodie favourite, The Stagg Inn.

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hergest ridge
Hergest Ridge
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The Stagg Inn
The Stagg Inn

2. Weobley Trail - the one with the gorgeous black and white houses

A short but sweet walk which wanders past beautiful ‘black and white’ half-timbered houses in the picture-perfect village of Weobley before going out into the surrounding green fields for open views. Discover a motte and bailey, the impressive church of St Peter and St Paul and plenty of fantastic traditional Tudor buildings. Afterwards, enjoy dinner at one of the villages renowned local eateries, choosing between Jules Restaurant and Ye Olde Salutation Inn.

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3. Castle & Rolls - the one with the romantic ruins

A walk to Wigmore Castle, a major centre of power for 500 years and home to the Mortimer family, who dominated this area in medieval times. Now a romantic ruin with amazing views, looked after by English Heritage. Then it's into the woods, known as the Wigmore Rolls, featuring a summit 288 metres high. Later, lunch at the acclaimed Riverside at Aymestrey or the welcoming Castle Inn.

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wigmore
Wigmore Castle
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Food at Riverside Amestry
The Riverside Amestry

4. Jewel in the Downs - the one with the wide open views

A picturesque walk climbing up the Bromyard Downs for impressive views over the town. The Bromyard Downs is 114-hectares of common land grazed by livestock and home to a true abundance of nature. It has long connections with agriculture and you'll see signs of the old drovers'  paths that were used to walk livestock to market. Later, kick off your muddy boots and enjoy a well-earned lunch at Three Horsehoes Inn.

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5. The Deer Walk - the one with scenic, challenging hills

A beautiful scenic walk near Ledbury, with a couple of strenuous hills to challenge your fitness. The routes takes in the Eastnor Deer Park,  a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and home to a herd of red deer. Within the park you'll find the Somers Obelisk, a monument which can be seen for miles around. It's then on to Midsummer Hill which is situated in the Malvern Hills - it's a bit of a climb, but well worth the views. On your return, take in the magical view of Eastnor Castle, a 19th-century mock castle which was built between 1811-1820. Then, tuck into a roast at The Feathers or The Farmers Arms.

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EASTNOR DEER PARK
Eastnor Deer Park
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The Feathers Hotel
The Feathers

6. Ramble by the Wye - the one with country churches & a delightful footbridge

Admire the River Wye as you step along the riverbank, taking in the countryside’s peace and quiet and stumbling on beautiful churches along the way. This tranquil route takes in the delightful Sellack Suspension Footbridge which was built in 1895 to link the parish churches of Kings Caple and Sellack St. Tysilio's Church. Diners are absolutely spoilt for choice with The Loughpool, New Inn and The Cottage of Content all nearby.

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7. The Wye, Woods & Caves - the one with the legendary cave

A gorgeous walk in the Wye Valley which starts in Symonds Yat and follows the River Wye as it carves its way through cliffs and hills on both sides. Trek on through ancient woods, up to the summit to get the heart pumping, before reaching the fabled King Arthur’s Cave which is said to have been occupied 10,000 years ago and counting. Along the way, see the last hand ferry on the Wye and spot the resident peregrine falcons. Finally, enjoy a delicious lunch at The Old Court Hotel  or Ye Olde Ferrie Inn.

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Arthur's Cave
Arthur's Cave
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Ye Old Ferrie Inn
Ye Old Ferrie Inn

8. Garway Hill with the ponies - yes, there's another one with wild ponies!

The 360 degree views at the top of Garway Hill are outstanding with views to the Malverns and Black Mountains. It's just you … and the wild grazing ponies! It's a glorious spot, you'll feel completely surrounded by countryside and the tranquility of nature. Afterwards, retreat to a fabulous country pub for lunch. We highly recommend The New Inn and The Kilpeck Inn.

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9. Arthur's Stone & The Golden Valley - the one with the sacred Neolithic stones

Roam the magical Golden Valley and look across to the Black Mountains as you make for the prehistoric Arthur’s Stone, an atmospheric Neolithic burial chamber made of great stone slabs. The tomb has been linked to King Arthur since before the 13th century and also inspired the writings of CS Lewis - just think of the stone table upon which Aslan the Lion is sacrificed. Along the way Merbach Hill offers wonderful views of the River Wye and the Wye Valley. There's great places to eat nearby, including the newly opened Bulls Head, the ever delightful Bridge Inn at Michaelchurch Escley, the Temple Bar Inn in Ewyas Harold or the oldest pub in Herefordshire, The Pandy Inn.

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Children playing underneath Arthur's Stone
Arthur's Stone
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The Pandy Inn
The Pandy Inn

10. Breinton Springs - the one with orchards which can be walked from the city centre

This pretty walk from Hereford city centre along the River Wye to Breinton Springs takes you through orchards which are beautiful in all seasons - from blossom and bluebells in the spring to apples in the autumn. Breinton Springs is a gorgeous spot, great for birdwatching, and has a pretty church to visit as well as earthworks which are the remains of Breinton Camp. Return to the city for superlative dining at the award-winning Bookshop, Hereford Bar & Brasserie or Castle House Restaurant.

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11. Marcle Ridge & Woolhope Dome - the one with the fossils

The unique local geology has created a soft rolling countryside around Marcle Ridge, but as you gradually ascend the ridge you will see way beyond this to the dramatic Black Mountains in one direction and to the Malvern Hills in the other. Wander through this rich mosaic of ancient oak and mixed woodlands, species-rich hedgerows, wildflower meadows, traditional orchards and streams, all supporting a wealth of wildlife.  And look for the fossils formed in the coral seas 400 million years ago. Then retire to The Crown Inn for a slap-up lunch with local cider, including the pub's own home-milled tipple.

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12. Magic in Mortimer Country - the one for fairytale feels

A magnificent march across Mortimer Country, complete with a handsome castle, an ancient hill fort, a magical valley and a mischievous woodland sprite…There are big views to be found on this varied walk, but the intimate atmosphere of Fishpool Dingle is a particular delight. Here you’ll find beautiful beech woods and towering Douglas firs, remnants of quarries and lime kilns, a chain of ponds that once provided fish for the castle’s kitchen, and Georgian follies and grottoes.

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13. Adventures on the Border: Cat's Back

The Black Hill or The Cat’s Back is in the Black Mountains. It's known as the Cat’s Back due to the hill resembling the appearance of a hunched, sitting cat. Traversing the border between England and Wales, this is an energetic walk, but you will be rewarded with the most stunning views.

Afterwards, eat a magnificent lunch at The Bulls Head at Craswell which is one of the last unspoiled drovers' inns in England, or dine by the riverside at The Bridge Inn, Michaelchurch Escley, which was named one of the UK's best pubs by The Telegraph.

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